Assets

What is this I hear about you?

There was no argument about it, no attempt at self-justification; simply a recognition that he had been caught (Luke 16: 1- 13). But rather than throw himself on the mercy of the rich employer, the manager started trying to figure out how to make the best out of a bad situation.

Jesus does not elaborate on what the manager had used the resources at his disposal for. We are simply told he squandered his employer’s assets. If this was a substantial charge to be levelled against someone then, squandering assets is almost considered unforgiveable today. Careers and reputations are lost in these days of austerity if it is perceived that a manager, whether in the private, public or third-sector, has been guilty of squandering hard earned resources, especially financial ones.

Yet, there are times when we must all be wary. ‘What is this I hear about you?’ calls us all to account and lets us know we have been accused of squandering. Perhaps not financial but what of our squandering the resources of the earth; our squandering the resources of young, middle aged and elderly people alike while we participate in a socio-economic system that seems content to allow their gifts and talents go to waste; our squandering the resources of power and privilege exercised for personal and group gain rather than the common and global good? There may not be many who can stand without remembering how we have been guilty of squandering that with which we have been entrusted as stewards of the things of heaven.

The manager was concerned (rightly!) with his future. Yet, instead of throwing himself on the mercy and compassion of his employer, he decides the way to ensure future welcome and friendship was through fraud; so he rewrote the debtors’ bills. It is a hard challenge to hear how this approach seems to have been appreciated by the owner (and Jesus?) who, rather than castigating his manager, commends him for shrewdness. Behind this shrewdness is the wisdom word of the wise man who built his house upon the rock (Matthew 7:24) and the virgins in contrast with the foolish who had sufficient oil in their lamps for the whole of the wedding feast (Matthew 25: 1 – 13).

Can Jesus really be sharing this as an example for his disciples to copy? This is complicated. For me, I am trying to hear here a challenge to consider how I wish to be welcomed by God and remain friends with him, even with the noise of the accusatory ‘what is this I hear about you?’ filling the air, and fill the air it does.

The squandering manager acted in character to save his future, and acted in fraud. So, how are the disciples, the people of God, to act in character when they/ we wish to know the welcome and friendship of God, into the forever eternal future beginning today? If the manager acted as he did to save his major asset, his life, what will the children of light do to save their major asset, the salvation of their life and soul?

Given this, what assets do we have before a creator God? It would seem that we have lost sight of the fact that any assets we have before God are ones that have first been entrusted to us by him. Our accusation may be we have taken as gospel that we are the creators rather than the created and as such can do what we like with those things we believe are ours and ours alone. We live without remembering that anything we own has been granted unto us for the purposes of the kingdom rather than personal reward. In this, we have become servants of mammon, rather than servants of God.

Thus, as God asks of us in this coming week, ‘what is this I hear about you?’, may we respond in a spirit of repentance and hope; may we strive to live out the grace granted unto us in salvation through God’s greatest asset, and our richest blessing, even his Son Jesus Christ; and, may God hear of lives of service given on behalf of the Kingdom rather than of assets squandered.

Lord, have mercy…

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